Displaying posts categorized under

Exercise

With Strength, Don’t Neglect Flexibility

wsdnfEspecially critical to Rogers and Klaus’ success and safety is core strength and flexibility–both key, often neglected elements of fitness. Having a strong core–the erector muscles of your lower back and the rectus abdominis, obliques and transverse abdominis of your stomach–will help you avoid nagging back injuries that can not only make for a painful golf swing, but can also knock your training off-track. A firmed-up midsection will help you handle heavier weight with exercises such as squats and standing shoulder presses, which translates to more muscle gain. Lastly, increased flexibility will reduce injuries and muscle soreness and give you greater range of motion.

TRAINING SPECIFICS

On days when he doesn’t jump out of a plane several times, Klaus usually lifts weights for an hour to an hour and a half. Because his work recruits even the smallest and most …

Recent Exercise Q&A

Q: I’ve read lots of articles that recommend weight lifting for runners. What are your recommendations?

B.H., AVON LAKE, OHIO

reA: I do a lot of total-body strength conditioning, even during my racing season. The program I follow was developed for me by Phil and Jim Wharton, who wrote The Wharton Strength Book. Their book is easy to follow, and the exercises they recommend don’t require a lot of equipment. They explain how many sets to do and how much weight to lift.

The most important muscles to work on are your stabilizer muscles, which include your hips, glutes, lower back, and inner and outer thighs. You also need to strengthen your lower abdominals. If these muscles are strong, you’ll maintain good running form even when you become tired. As you draw closer to your big competitions, back …

Keeping Your Kids In Shape Creates Success!

kykisStrength training can even help children achieve non-physical benefits like being able to set and work toward goals, developing an understanding and respect for rules, overcoming failure and developing good work patterns and attitudes. At Lift for Life Gym in St. Louis, Missouri, 92 of children participating in strength training programs graduate from high school, as opposed to 67 percent of nonparticipants citywide.

Faigenbaum takes it one step further, suggesting that successful strength training can build self-esteem. “The psychological effects are huge,” he says. Faigenbaum sees kids developing better social skills, and parents report their kids act up less frequently, have more respect for others and work harder in school.

Many of the ailments that plague adults, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, have their roots in early childhood. By starting a strength training program early, many of …